Mythology Monday: Children of the Night: Nemesis

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Nemesis was the goddess of revenge who sometimes went by Adrasteia. But it’s important to note she’s not evil. She’s balance. When someone has too much good fortune, she knocks them off their pedestal. When they commit a wrong, she sees that the pain they inflicted on others is restored to them full-fold.

She is either the daughter of Nyx alone, Nyx and Erebus, or a child of Oceanus, or even a daughter of Zeus. In some versions of the myths, she is also the mother of Helen of Troy and Castor and Pollux. In this lesser known version, she attempts to escape Zeus’ advances by turning into a goose, instead, Zeus turns into a swan and rapes her anyway. She lays three eggs, but before they can hatch she’s startled off by a random shepherd, who gives the eggs to Leda. They hatch and are, surprise, people, and the story continues from there unchanged.

Nemesis also introduced Narcissus to his reflection, killed a girl that offended Artemis, and set up the rape of a girl named Nikaia for killing Hymnos.

In some myths she hooks up with Tartarus and gives birth to the four Telchines: Aktaios, Megalesios, Ormenos and Lykos. In some versions there are nine of them, and in some versions they aren’t Nemesis’ offspring at all. The Telchines were the first inhabitants of the island of Rhodes. The Telchines were very skilled metal workers and made weapons for the gods. They were so good, they were sometimes worshipped themselves. They may have raised Poseidon or Zeus when Rhea had to hide them. They controlled wet weather and could shapeshift into any form they wanted. The Olympians eventually destroyed them because they created this mixture of Stygian water (water from the Styx) and sulfur that could destroy plants and animals.

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2 thoughts on “Mythology Monday: Children of the Night: Nemesis

  1. Pingback: Mythology Monday: Attendants of Zeus | Kaitlin Bevis

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